Friday, August 7, 2009

RIP, John Hughes

John Hughes (1950- 2009)
At the time I came along, Hollywood's idea of teen movies meant there had to be a lot of nudity, usually involving boys in pursuit of sex, and pretty gross overall. Either that or a horror movie. And the last thing Hollywood wanted in their teen movies was teenagers!
John Hughes
The world is slowly losing its best people.

Just this morning, I heard that one of my favourite directors, John Hughes, died of Heart Attack.

Hughes' movies has huge impact on me seeing myself in most of the characters in his movies (like Andy of Pretty in Pink and Sam of Sixteen Candles both played by Molly Ringwald). He also sparked the rebellion with a cause in me with his movie, The Breakfast Club. (remember the letter they made to Mr. Vermon?) I remember having to go around most of the leading video stores in search of his movies (which I got by the way, but is now missing-- in another story).

It's really sad that people like him die early. They could have done more. While people with bad intentions, live longer. And can 2009 be more disappointing now?

But I believe that Hughes has lived his life fully. That in his lifetime, his movies transcended X and Y generations. He made adults realize that like them, Teens should be taken seriously because at some point, not everything is about them, it's about the youth. Give us time to grow, realize our mistakes, and live our life to the fullest. In time, we'll be who you want us to be, more responsible and strong enough to face the world.
My generation had to be taken seriously because we were stopping things and burning things. We were able to initiate change, because we had such vast numbers. We were part of the baby boom, and when we moved, everything moved with us.
John Hughes

Let me end this entry with the letter from The Breakfast Club written for Mr. Vermon
Saturday, March 24, 1984. Shermer High School, Shermer, Illinois. 60062.

Dear Mr. Vernon, we accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in detention for whatever it was that we did wrong. What we did WAS wrong. But we think you're crazy to make us write this essay telling you who we think we are. What do you care? You see us as you want to see us... in the simplest terms and the most convenient definitions. You see us as a brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess and a criminal. Correct? That's the way we saw each other at seven o'clock this morning. We were brainwashed.

Dear Mr. Vernon, we accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in detention for whatever it was we did wrong. What we did WAS wrong, but we think you're crazy to make us write an essay telling you who we think we are. You see us as you want to see us... In the simplest terms and the most convenient definitions. But what we found out is that each one of us is ... a brain...
Andrew Clark: ...and an athlete...
Allison Reynolds: ...and a basket case...
Claire Standish: ...a princess...
John Bender: ...and a criminal...
Brian Johnson: Does that answer your question?
Sincerely yours, the Breakfast Club.


Rest in Peace, John Hughes. You will be sorely missed.

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It's sad that in two consecutive entries, I've written things about great people dying.
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